Chit-Chat

Imagine you are told to create a presentation about what is currently happening in your classroom. Sounds easy, right? Now imagine you are confined to 20 slides, each slide only showing for 20 seconds, totalling to exactly a 6 minute and 40 second keynote. Also let’s just throw in a random word of the day (i.e. be-dash, xylography, capriccio, ambivert) from dictionary.com for funzies. Now I bet you’re feeling the pressure.

Keep in mind the other members of your team are presenting as well, same format and they too have to use a random word of the day. So you are not alone, well, except when it’s your turn to do your presentation.

This challenges your presentation ability, forcing you to be clear and concise. Obviously, structuring your story is key to your presentation, but putting in the right image also helps. Even though this takes you out of your comfort zone, this shouldn’t stop you from sharing your ideas. In fact, I feel it’s an added bonus for changing things up. As for our presentations, they all went smoothly for the most part, but what it really boils down to is practice and more practice.

So, why would we do this as a team? Challenge. We do a number of staff presentations that can be easily taken into the classroom. This just gives our staff, and you as well, something that you could try in your classroom or have your students attempt. This particular format/style is actually a real presentation structure called PechaKucha, a Japanese word that translates into chit-chat.

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One Comment
  1. I taught this to my Forensics kids. They did a pretty great job with it; it’s a good way to introduce new things to the kids, teaching them conciseness and intention. Thanks for sharing this with us!

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