Learning Path to becoming a Microsoft Innovative Educator (MIE)

I have always found it interesting how corporations have been trying to push their product or idea into the education scene. In today’s age, this would refer to up and coming tech firms as well as the already well established. Companies like, Google, Microsoft, and Apple, have a product that will allow your staff and students to create, showcase, document, and organized work production. All three companies all also have an education series that allows educators to pursue to become an expert, innovator, or distinguishable with their product. Out of the three, Microsoft is late to the game when it comes to offering such programs. But just because they are new to the game, doesn’t mean that what they have to offer is a “has been,” educator program. What Microsoft has to offer is very refreshing, and I hope you take in consideration to hear what I have to say about it.

My journey into becoming a Microsoft Certified Expert (MIE), was somewhat manageable, a challenge set by our very own Director of Learning Innovation.

 

When I first logged into Microsoft Education system, I have to admit, it was a little intimidating, especially how to navigate and find what intrigues you. Right away the front page recommends courses that you can pick and choose that apply to your practice. But! Here is where I am going to tell you to find the Learning Paths section and select Microsoft calls, 21 Century Learning Design(21CLD). What intrigued me about this path was the real world skills that we want our students to build within and outside the classroom. Those skills are collaboration, skilled communication, knowledge construction, self-regulation, real-world problem solving, and using ICT for learning.

What you will find once you take a course is how Microsoft codes essential skill to it’s the simplest form. For example, it explores the broader meaning of collaboration and breaks down collaboration into five essential questions. “What are the big ideas in collaboration.”? “What does working together mean?” “What does shared-responsibility mean?” “What does making substantive decisions mean?” and “What does working interdependently mean?”

So what does this all mean, once you go through this course you will take a 8 question quiz that you have to pass with 80% to receive credit. But that’s, the least of why you should do this. You should do this course because it completely matches up to the Expected Student Learning Results (ESLR’s) or the four C’s (Creativity, Communication, Collaboration, and Critical Thinking). Not only does it match up but it gives clarity on how to create situations for students to experience these skills. And, to put the icing on the cake, Microsoft does a fine job providing resources around 21CLD. Resources include rubrics, lessons, and coding of skills for educators to apply in their teachings.

TL;DL:

Becoming a Microsoft Certified Expert (MIE) is easy. But I suggest taking the course on 21 Century Learning Design as it applies to your practice right away.

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